Three for Three: Micro-Fiction for March

It’s still March, so I’m getting this one in just under the wire.

In case some of you don’t know, micro fiction (or flash fiction, or micro-narrative, or however you want to label it) is something of an interest of mine. For almost four years now, I have been endeavoring to write a micro short a day and post it to my Twitter account @Liam_Aidan.

This necessarily means squishing any tale I want to tell into 140 characters, including spaces, which is fun, challenging, inspiring, and annoying in turn. It’s a self imposed limit, an attempt to distill the essence of  a story into as small a space as possible, and hopefully improve my writing skills as a result.

Last year, a collection of 106 of the best of my micro shorts, called Vestigial Tales, was published as an ebook by Ichabod Press. You can find out more about that here.

VTCover

Possibly the most famous piece of flash fiction is Ernest Hemingway’s six word story For Sale:

“For sale: Baby shoes, never worn.”

Although I think my personal favorite has to be Knock by Fredric Borwn, the first lines of which constitute a micro short in and of themselves:

“The last man on Earth sat alone in a room. There was a knock on the door…”

Both of these epically tiny tales served as inspiration for my initial foray into micro fiction on Twitter (or twitfic, as a few of us call it), but if you’re looking for additional daily doses of fast and sometimes furious fiction, why not check out my three micro-fiction recommendations below? Each is worth a follow and even the occasional RT.

Twiterati

Arjun Basu

Vikram Paralkar

Very Short Story

Now if they don’t fill your Twitter stream with wonder and delight, then I don’t know what will.

Thanks for reading. I’ll be back soon.

TTFN!

2 thoughts on “Three for Three: Micro-Fiction for March

  1. I’ve always liked the “unsaid” of micro fiction. The best ones combine the subtlety of the mundane with the unexpected. I’d forgotten about the Hemingway one, heartbreaking every time.

    1. Thanks for your comment weebluebird. Interesting point about micro fiction and the “unsaid” – I’ve always thought the best fiction swells in the mind of the reader and micro fiction definitely leaves a lot of room for imaginative growth.

      Little steps to Somewhere looks inspiring. I shall follow your posts with interest!

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